2018 - Falstaff

Die Kellerei Terlan hat von jeher einen hervorragenden Ruf für ihre langlebigen Weißweine.

Die Gewächse aus Terlan starten langsam, brauchen etwas länger Zeit sich zu entwickeln, sind dann aber komplex und eigenständig. In der Schatzkammer ...

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2017 - Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

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2018 - James Suckling

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2018 - Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

"I enjoyed a very special afternoon with winemaker Rudi Kofler visiting the extreme vineyard sites above the town of Terlano, located halfway between Bolzano and Merano along the Adige River valley. The Vorberg vineyards are planted at near vertical inclines ...

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2018 - Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

"I enjoyed a very special afternoon with winemaker Rudi Kofler visiting the extreme vineyard sites above the town of Terlano, located halfway between Bolzano and Merano along the Adige River valley. The Vorberg vineyards are planted at near vertical inclines ...

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2014 - Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

The jagged peaks of Italy's Dolomite Mountains mark the northern terminus of Mediterranean wine. The last lemon trees and olive groves butt against the foot of this imposing natural barrier. At the 46th parallel, they soak in the northern-most Italian sunshine. Beyond these mountains, Middle Europe's agricultural identity is conditioned by frozen winters, flatter color contrasts and a Continental climate. Italian wine pushes the extreme limits of its northern border: Grapevines are planted at perilously high altitudes on mountain walls and they cover the nooks and crannies of the valley terrain in high density. Italian wine makes a proud final stand at the crown of the peninsula.

The Dolomites are made of a rare composition of minerals that give these mountains a unique ability to refract sunlight with crystalline pink and coral colors. They consist of calcium and magnesium carbonate, also known as magnesium limestone. One some days, the purity of light is so startling, distant ridges come into remarkable focus with serrated crags and ragged spires. Isolation and geographic extremism make Trentino and Alto Adige a rewarding and authentic wine destination.

In order to underline their territorial identities, I have grouped wine reviews for Alto Adige and Trentino separately. I have also provided brief introductory remarks for both regions. The vintage notes, on the other hand, refer to both Alto Adige and Trentino as one.

  • Vorberg '07

    95 punti
    The 2007 Alto Adige Pinot Bianco Riserva Vorberg offers a sneak peek back in time. What it reveals is the enormous aging potential of Pinot Bianco from the cool climate of the Italian Dolomites. The wine opens to beautifully delineated mineral tones with brimstone and crushed oyster shells. At the back are softer tones of dried apricot and raw honeycomb. It shows impeccable silkiness on the palate with good grip on the palate and the finish. If you have a bottle in your cellar, this wine is definitely worth opening.
  • Chardonnay '00

    95 punti
    Almost 15 years after the harvest, the 2000 Alto Adige Terlano Chardonnay is a monumental achievement and a living testament to the aging potential of Italian white wines. This wine is built to last and I'd venture that it could withstand another decade of aging. At this point in its evolution, the wine still shows fruit tones with lemon curd, dried apricot and poached pear. But it also exhibits tertiary aromas of chestnut honey, white licorice and crushed mineral that evoke the startling white rocks of the Dolomites. With 12 months of oak aging in oak cask, the wine is not overloaded with wood tones. In fact, it speaks purely of Chardonnay and shows nothing but varietal character.
  • Quarz '11

    94 punti
    Italian Sauvignon Blanc really does't get any better than the 2011 Alto Adige Terlano Sauvignon Quarz. This delicious expression offers an extended list of aromas that starts with citrus and exotic fruit and ends far down the road with toasted almond and butterscotch. Along the way, you encounter saline mineral tones, spice and candied orange peel. The mouthfeel is creamy and rich, but also shows a high degree of pliancy and energy. You can drink this wine now, or better yet try it five years from now.
  • Vorberg '11

    94 punti
    One of my favorite white wines from Northern Italy, the 2011 Alto Adige Pinot Bianco Riserva Vorberg is dazzling and impressive on both the nose and in the mouth. It offers a full package of varietal purity with aromas of pear, quince, Golden Delicious apple and honeysuckle. Aged 12 months in large oak casks, it imparts a seductively rich and creamy texture on the long finish. This beauty promises to age ten years or more and will develop more mineral nuances as it continues its bottle evolution.
  • Nova Domus '11

    93 punti
    A blend of 60% Pinot Bianco, 30% Chardonnay and 10% Sauvignon Blanc, the 2011 Alto Adige Terlano Nova Domus Riserva hits all the right sensorial buttons. Aromas of quince, honeysuckle, pear, citrus and lime flow effortlessly from the bouquet. Warmer tones of caramel and toasted almond add to the complexity and sharp mineral notes also contribute to the compelling ensemble. The best part, however, is the mouthfeel. This is a full-bodied white (it sees 12 months of botte grande and tonneaux) to pair with sophisticated cuisine. It promises ten more years of bottle evolution, if not more.
  • Lunare '11

    92 punti
    The 2011 Alto Adige Gewürztraminer Lunare is aged 50% in botte grande and 50% in stainless steel. The results of this careful regime give the wine an equally high degree of freshness and complexity that ultimately distinguish this exceptional white wine. The fruit tones embrace lime, papaya and honeydew melon. Background notes offer crushed mineral, jasmine and white rose. I'd love to revisit this wine in five years to check on its ongoing evolution.
  • Porphyr '10

    92 punti
    The 2010 Alto Adige Lagrein Riserva Porphyr (aged 18 months in barrique) offers a unique interpretation of this Northern Italian native grape. Lagrein can sometimes show raw, rustic notes of tilled earth and dried cherry skin. Here instead, you get beautifully detailed berry nuances with light spice, tobacco and leather at the back. The quality of the tannins is smooth and soft, but the wine has the natural heft and acidity to promise more bottle evolution ahead.
  • Winkl '12

    92 punti
    The medium-bodied 2012 Alto Adige Terlano Sauvignon Winkl is a stunning wine that embodies all the best qualities associated with unoaked Sauvignon Blanc. What sets it apart is the stunning purity of its aromas: white flowers, exotic fruit, jasmine and wild sage emerge gracefully from the bouquet. Those pristine flavors are backed by energy and an exciting sense of high-altitude mountain freshness.
  • Siemegg '11

    92 punti
    A 70-30 blend of Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc, the 2011 Alto Adige Cabernet Riserva Siemegg shows a dark, penetrating color and rich concentration. Yet, the bouquet is surprisingly delicate with soft spice, dark fruit, cassis, blackberry and plum. It shows power in the mouth with equal footing in both tannic firmness and acidic freshness. Give it a few more years to unwind in your cellar.
  • Lunare '12

    91 punti
    Cantina Terlano's 2012 Alto Adige Gewürztraminer is a standout expression of the grape. Compelling and enticing, the bouquet beckons with seductive aromas of wild sage, jasmine, exotic fruit and freshly diced peach. Everything about the nose is fresh and vibrant. Creamy smoothness tops off the silky finish. Some 133,000 bottles were produced.
  • Kreuth '12

    91 punti
    Aged for eight months in large oak casks, the 2012 Alto Adige Terlano Chardonnay Kreuth manages the difficult task of being direct and straightforward, but complex and intriguing at the same time. It does this thanks to the inherent freshness of its citrus and stone fruit aromas that slowly shift to become white almond and light vanilla spice as the wine warms in the glass. It offers good weight in the mouth too, with a thick texture that feels silky and smooth.
  • Monticol '11

    91 punti
    The 2011 Alto Adige Pinot Noir Riserva Montigl is a silky and seductive expression of the great Burgundian grape with Italian-specific nuances of Mediterranean herb, Alpine flower and fragolino di bosco (wild strawberries). The purity of these aromas is stunning and the warm 2011 vintage seems to have further heightened the intensity of the bouquet.
  • Gries '11

    91 punti
    The 2011 Alto Adige Lagrein Riserva Gries opens to a dark garnet color with hues of purple and plum at the rims. The bouquet reveals layers of Morello cherry, fresh fig, prune and light shadings of baking spice or nutmeg. This Italian red ages on oak for 12 months, 70% in botte grande and 20% in barrique. The tannins are consequently soft and ripe.
  • Siebeneich '11

    90 punti
    The 2011 Alto Adige Merlot Riserva Siebeneich is a medium-bodied expression with a full range of red fruit, cherry and spice aromas. Pretty contours of dark mineral or crushed granite add focus and sharpness to the wine's aromatic presentation. Twelve months of oak aging (70% large casks and 30% barrique) have contributed to the polished, softly yielding nature of the tannins.
  • Pinot Bianco '12

    90 punti
    The 2012 Alto Adige Pinot Bianco offers a clear view onto one of Northern Italy's most promising white grapes. The bouquet is deeply redolent of pear, Golden Delicious apple, peach and white melon. Added complexity is added by the saline-mineral notes of brimstone and white granite that appear on the edges. This great value wine offers good density and heft on the close.