Porphyr 2013

"Three selected sites with vines that are almost a hundred years old and so deliver highly concentrated chewy tannins form the basis of our Lagrein Selection. The wine is fermented and aged in barriques. That gives our Lagrein Porphyry, which owes its name to the bedrock on which the region’s vineyards stand, a complex and intensive nose, although the wine remains compact and distinctive on the palate."
Rudi Kofler

Wine

  • Doc denomination: Alto Adige
  • Variety: 100% Lagrein
  • History of the variety:
  • Year: 2013
  • Bottles produced: 22,000
  • Yield: 42 hl/ha
  • Quality line: The selections

Vinification

  • Description:

    Manual harvest and selection of the grapes; destemming followed by slow must fermentation at a controlled temperature and gentle agitation of the must in stainless steel tanks; malolactic fermentation and aging in barriques for 18 months using one third new barrels; blending three months before bottling.

Production area

  • Country: Alto Adige DOC
  • Provenance: Alto Adige
  • Altitude: 250 - 900 m a. s. l.
  • Slope: 5 - 70 %
  • Orientation: South - Southwest

Wine character

  • Color: deep impenetrable ruby with violet reflections
  • Smell: This Lagrein selection is a multifaceted wine. It reveals aromas reminiscent of morello cherry and bilberry, with notes of licorice, coffee beans, vanilla, clove and black tea, which makes it spicy and fruity at the same time.
  • Taste: The wine is harmonious on the palate with very compact and concentrated, multilayered flavors combining juicy fruit with spicy, peppery elements and a slightly sweet note of dark chocolate rounded off with silky tannins.

Simple pairings

Perfect with pink roasted saddle of venison in a walnut crust with root vegetables and red cabbage, rib of beef braised in Lagrein with mixed polenta and baby vegetables, or braised calf’s cheek with Lagrein sauce on celeriac foam.

  • Vintage

    Read all

    • 2013, a year of excellent whites and a Pinot Noir we are going to hear more about

      The last few weeks before the 2013 grape harvest were subject to pronounced temperature fluctuations: around 10-11°C during the night, rising to 25°C during the day. This thermal excursion has lent our white wines their crisp acidity and low pH.

  • Soil

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    • Alto Adige is one of Italy's smallest wine-growing areas. Located as it is at the interface between the Alpine north and the Mediterranean south, it is also one of its most diverse. Countless generations have shaped Alto Adige as a land of wine, where vines grow on various types of soil and in a range of climate zones at between 200 and 1,000 meters above sea-level. It is the home of authentic wines with a character of their own, with a focus on white wines: About 60 percent of the sites are planted with white varieties and only 40 percent with red.
      In addition to Pinot Grigio and Gewürztraminer, it is mainly Pinot Bianco, Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc that have made Alto Adige one of Italy's leading white wine regions. In the case of the reds, the range of wines includes the autochthonous varieties Lagrein and Schiava as well as such international classics as Pinot Noir, Merlot and Cabernet. With all their variety, 98 percent of Alto Adige's wines have a DOC classification, with an impressive share of top-class wines.

  • Climate

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    • The high peaks of the main Alpine chain protect South Tyrol from the Atlantic winds and cold northerlies, while the region benefits from the Mediterranean climate from the south. That explains the pronounced differences between day- and night-time temperatures, which are the key to full maturity and elegant wines.

      To the south, a number of mountain massifs like the Adamello also have a protective function. As a result, annual precipitation is only about one third of the average for the southern Alpine foothills, and the number of hours of sunshine is higher. The climatic conditions are not unlike those to be found in wine-growing areas like the Swiss Canton Valais.

      When the sun rises behind the mountains east of Terlano on one of the year’s 300 sunny days, it is already high in the sky as the wine-growing area has a westerly to south westerly exposure. The lower atmospheric density permits more direct solar irradiation with less diffuse sunlight. That increases the difference between the slopes on the sunny and shady sides of the valley.

      Microclimate in Terlano
      Continental climate (Cfa Köppen-Geiger)

      Annual sunshine hours: ø 2135
      Maximum temperatures: 38,2 °C
      Average temperatures: 12,9 °C
      Minimum temperatures: -10,7°C
      Annual percipitation: ø 558 mm
      Average global radiation: 150,1 W/m²
      Winds:
      - North foehn: cool and dry down-slope wind
      - Ora: valley wind system from the south, bringing in air from the Po Valley

Porphyr

Prizes

  • Antonio Galloni presents Vinous 2016: 93 points
  • falstaff 2016: 92 points
  • Robert Parker's Wine Advocate 2016: 92 points
  • Gardini Notes 2016: 92 points
  • Gambero Rosso - Vini d'Italia 2017: 2 glasses
  • Le guide de L'Espresso - I Vini d'Italia 2017: suggested wines
  • I Vini di Veronelli 2017: 94 points
  • Vitae - La guida vini AIS 2017:
  • ViniBuoni d'Italia 2017:
  • James Suckling 2016: 94 points
  • Bibenda/Duemilavini 2017:
  • Wine Enthusiast 2017: 91 points

Technical data

  • Alcohol content: 14.0 % vol
  • Residual sugar: 2.5 g/l
  • Total acidity: 5.6 g/l

Aging

  • Storage advice: Cool storage at constant temperatures, high level of humidity, good ventilation and as little light as possible
  • Cellar temperature: 10 - 15 °C
  • Minimum maturity: 6 years
  • Serving temperature: 18 °C

Suggested glass

Bordeaux glass

Bordeaux glass